Migrating NetApp filers

We are preparing to migrate from our FAS270c NetApp filer to a new FAS3050c.  Migration/Upgrade procedure documentation is a bit sketchy on the NetApp site, so I thought I should put together my own step-by-step.  Here it is, a work in progress…

Pre-migration:

  1. Verify destination filer settings:
    1. Quota configuration – compare /etc/quotas to current config on “files”.
    2. CIFS config:
      1. /etc/cifsconfig_shares.cfg
      2. /etc/cifsconfig_setup.cfg
      3. /etc/cifs_homedir.cfg
    3. Filer options:
      capture output from “options” command and compare settings to source filer. – DONE!
    4. DNS and WINS registration settings

Migration:

  1. Disable CIFS on the source filer:
    cifs terminate -t 0
  2. Force final SnapMirror synchronization:
    1. snapmirror update coffee:vol1
    2. snapmirror update coffee:vol2
    3. snapmirror update coffee:vol3
      (Note:  the “-w flag can be used if we want to wait for a mirror operation to complete before returning control to the console)
  3. Break snapmirror relationship:
    1. snapmirror break coffee:vol1
    2. snapmirror break coffee:vol2
    3. snapmirror break coffee:vol3
    4. update /etc/snapmirror.conf, remove old relationship definitions.
  4. Initialize quotas on target filer:
    1. quota on vol1
    2. quota on vol2
    3. quota on vol3
  5. Rename the source filer
  1. cf disable the cluster.
  2. Verify SPNs for “files” computer account.
  3. delete “files” computer account
  4. assign new IP address to the filer, reboot
  5. run cifs setup on source filer
    1. read config using rdfile /etc/hosts
    2. Assign new IP using ifconfig vif1-720 132.198.102.???
    3. ping to/from an external host to verify the update
    4. verify /etc/hosts and /etc/rc, then reboot to verify IP change
    5. update settings in options autosupport to reflect host name changes.
    6. Verify or force registrations in /etc/hosts, WINS, DNS.  May need to manually register DNS using “nsupdate” on cdc01.
  6. reboot to verify CIFS config files
  7. Check settings in /etc/nsswitch.conf
  8. cf enable  the cluster
  9. reset filer login info in dfm:
  1. dfm host set <hostname> hostlogin=<username>
  2. dfm host set <hostname> hostpassword=<password>
  • Rename the target filer
    1. cf disable the cluster.
    2. delete “blocks” computer account 
    3. assign new IP address to the filer, reboot
      1. read config using rdfile /etc/hosts
      2. Assign new IP using ifconfig vif1-720 132.198.102.16
      3. ping to/from an external host to verify the update
      4. verify /etc/hosts and /etc/rc, then reboot to verify IP change
      5. update settings in options.autosupport to reflect host name changes.
    4. run cifs setup on destination filer
    5. reboot to verify CIFS config files
    6. Verify or force registrations in /etc/hosts, WINS, DNS
    7. Check settings in /etc/nsswitch.conf
    8. cf enable  the cluster
    9. reset filer login info in dfm:
    1. dfm host set <hostname> hostlogin=<username>
    2. dfm host set <hostname> hostpassword=<password>
  • Post-migration testing:

    1. Home directory connections via CIFS (Windows 2000/XP/Mac)
      Verify all variations on homedir mounting still function:

      1. \filesNetID
      2. \files~
      3. \filescifs.homedir
    2. Home directory connection via SFTP/WebDAV
    3. Kerberos authentication from CAMPUS and “uvm.edu” k5 realm
    4. NTLM authentication levels/packet signing
    5. Quota enforcement
    6. Cluster failover
    7. DFM monitoring (need to update passwords used by DFM for connection to filers)
    8. Autosupport info in NOW.NETAPP.COM.
    9. NDMP backup from Networker.
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